Member Profile

Christopher Bates

PhD student, Department of Criminology, Law and Society at the University of California, Irvine

Contributor, Platypus: The CASTAC Blog

Research Interests

About Christopher

Christopher J. Bates is a fourth-year student in Criminology, Law and Society Department at UC Irvine. Chris’ employs novel spatial datasets, such as Google Street View, Twitter, and Socrata, and interdisciplinary methodology, from economics, criminology, & geography, to research the community context of crime. In addition to his research interests, Chris has a passion for using technology to publicly communicate research findings through websites, videos, and interactive applications.

Contact

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Publications

Articles

Using Social Media to Measure Temporal Ambient Population: Does it Help Explain Local Crime Rates?

John R. Hipp, Christopher Bates, Moshe Lichman, Padhraic Smyth (2018) | Justice Quarterly 36(4): 718-748 | http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07418825.2018.1445276

Systematic social observation of children’s neighborhoods using Google Street View: a reliable and cost-effective method

Candice L. Odgers, Avshalom Caspi, Christopher J. Bates, Robert J. Sampson, Terrie E. Moffitt (2012) | Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 53(10): 1009-1017 | http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-7610.2012.02565.x

Contributions to Platypus: The CASTAC Blog

View all of Christopher's posts on Platypus: The CASTAC Blog.

Regulating Physical Places with Digital Code

Editor’s Note: This is the seventh and final post in our Law in Computation series.

At first, I was perplexed by the K5 by Knightscope, a “fully autonomous security data machine,” rolling through the Irvine Spectrum Shopping Center last summer. Now, I am not cavalier, nor naive, about my rights to privacy, confidentiality, and anonymity, but I fully accept that I will be captured by surveillance cameras from my arrival to departure in many private places. After all, there is a strong market demand for surveillance technologies, and the market has long existed with little regulations from statutory or case law; their use continues to expand as the cost of sensors and data processing decreases. (more…)