Member Profile

Baird Campbell

PhD candidate, Rice University

Affiliated researcher, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile

Editor, Platypus: The CASTAC Blog

Research Interests

About Baird

Baird Campbell is a PhD candidate in anthropology at Rice University. He holds an MA in Latin American Studies from Tulane University. His research explores the intersections of social media, self-making, and trans activism in contemporary Chile. His dissertation research was supported by the Social Sciences Research Council, the Wenner-Gren Foundation, and the National Science Foundation.

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Contributions to Platypus: The CASTAC Blog

View all of Baird's posts on Platypus: The CASTAC Blog.

The Networked Animita: Transgender Remembrance on Social Media

Tomorrow, November 20th, the world will commemorate Transgender Day of Remembrance, a day to collectively mourn and remember those who have died as a result of transphobia. Started in 1999 by US trans woman Gwendolyn Ann Smith, Transgender Day of Remembrance is now observed in countries around the world, including my primary field site, Chile.

In this post, I explore how social media might be understood as a technology of memorialization and mourning, especially for marginalized groups. Inspired by informal roadside shrines called animitas, popular in Chile and elsewhere in Latin America, I propose the ‘networked animita’ as a useful analytic for understanding trans remembrance online. I do so through an exploration of the digital afterlife of Chilean trans activist, educator, interlocutor, and friend Mara Rita Villaroel Oñate. (more…)

STS and Electoral Politics

In the context of the upcoming US presidential election and increasing evidence of the importance of voting infrastructure, this week we revisit past posts that highlight the key role STS must play in these conversations. (more…)

Roundtable: “COVID-19: Views from the Field”

We’re wrapping up our five-part series, “COVID-19: Views from the Field,” with a pre-recorded roundtable. This roundtable brought our authors into conversation with each other, across continents and timezones, to discuss conducting—or not conducting—fieldwork in places not understood as COVID-19 “hotspots.”

Check out the video here, and follow the links below to read the whole series, also available in the language of each field site.

[youtube id=”Kmw4q-eoxNI” type=”video”]

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